How to Find the Right Mobility Scooter to Buy?

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There are many different types of mobility scooter found in the market today.  These are qualified as medical assistive devices, yet they are also considered as a lifestyle choice. When trying to look for something to buy for yourself, make sure it will cater to your specific needs. 

Like for instance, if you happen to have arthritic fingers, what you’ll need to look for is an assistive scooter model that comes with controls and a tiller. Otherwise, you are bound to buy something that is not at all very comfortable or safest to use.  

Pavement Mobility Scooters

This type of scooter is ideal for use when you travel on paved pathways. If you see someone riding an assistive scooter inside a shopping mall, then it surely falls under this category. If your place of residence is close to a high street and you know exactly how to get yourself to your destination by veering away from main roads, this type of disability equipment is a good choice to consider.  

Scooters belonging to this category are lighter in weight, smaller in size, and are cheaper in size. They usually come in 3, 4, or sometimes in 5 wheels. A 3-wheeled scooter is most ideal for indoor use since they are far easier to maneuver as opposed to other types of scooters. If you happen to live in a condominium or a building with small elevators, this is most recommended for you.  

While other types of scooters are highlighted by faster speeds, we recommend that you drive only at 6km/h on pavements. There are also other models that you can cap the speed level to reach this legal limit.  

Heavier Scooters

traditional wheelchairThese mobility types of scooters are heavier in terms of weight. Compared to smaller types that are ideal for pavement use, these are larger, bulkier, and are thus heavier. They come at speeds that are up to 12km/h. 

Built for power and use of bigger batteries, they are far more suitable for use in longer, more exhausting journeys. These types of scooters for mobility are more than capable of going 1on uphill climbs. Most of the time also they are packed with rear and front lights, hazard lights, indicators, brakes, a rear-view mirror, and a horn. 

They tend to give users a more comfortable ride as opposed to their smaller counterparts, and we attribute this to their built-in suspension.  

Top Things to Consider Before You Buy a Scooter

  • Your place of residence (city with cobblestones, building with elevator, etc)
  • What kind of journey do you usually make
  • What kinds of terrain you’ll usually cover
  • What storage facilities do you have
  • Consider your size and  body weight 
  • Consider your budget 

If you are always on the go, traveling most of the time by car or airplane, a portable mobility scooter would be most recommended for your use. You can easily and conveniently fold this type of scooter when not in use or you can have it disassembled for storage.